Political Articles
  • End the ObamaNation: Don't Let Communism Interpret Your Constitution
  • by Mike Rmharrington
  • In the context of an ObamaNation, it would seem that government is established for the purpose of redistributing the wealth, regulating personal choices and declaring the moral standards under which the nation will submit. But such an ObamaNation is merely a reflection of Communism, wherein the concept of individualism is overshadowed by the mechanisms that constitute Big Government.
  • Easy Crisis Management Plan Template - Sample Crisis Management Plan
  • by James Scott
  • It happens to the best of companies: business is booming one day, and the next an employee can become embroiled in a scandal or one of the company's products can cause harm to a consumer or the environment, sparking a public relations nightmare. However, you can reduce the negative impact by following these 15 steps:
  • Perception Management and Subliminal Perception: How Political Parties Market Their Ideas
  • by James Scott
  • Clearly a productive positivity as a subliminal tool involve more than enthusing people about their party's platform or their candidate. In a convention when it's time to criticize the other side it can neither diminish the existing positive mood nor draw negativity toward a party's own candidate. Achieving this balance in a convention can determine the fate of the rest of a campaign.
  • The Politics Of Uncommon Values
  • by Scott F Paradis
  • Americans will soon be casting votes, attempting to influence the course of government and in turn the course of the nation. The answer to America's challenges does not lie with politicians - solutions to what ails us rest with the people. Only by renewing our commitment to uncommon values will the United States survive and thrive. Let us, Americans, take responsibility for America's future. Uncommon commitment to uncommon values is what we need.
  • Creating An Election Lawn Sign
  • by Ben Hanania
  • Election lawn signs are the most cost effective tool to create name recognition if you happen to be running for public office. But they have to be done the right way to really be effective.
  • 5 Great Ways To Use Political Election Signs
  • by Ben Hanania
  • If you're running for political office, name recognition is critical to the success of your campaing. You'll get the most results for the least cost by using political campaign signs.
  • History of Psychological Warfare in Cold War Russia and USSR Active Measures
  • by James Scott
  • While psychological warfare had been a tool to support more direct military operations in World War II, during the Cold War psychological warfare became an end in itself. A Russia considered anything related to its psychological operations classified until the mid-1990s, it remains difficult to find too many details about its programs.
  • The History of Psychological Warfare
  • by James Scott
  • All war has the simple objective of making the enemy bend to one's own will. All losses inflicted upon the enemy, all injuries imposed, and all ammunition expended serve the purpose of changing the enemy's mind. When leaders can change an enemy's mind without firing a round, they secure victory while preserving lives and resources on both sides. Psychological warfare has been practiced to this end since the earliest accounts of conflict.
  • History of Psychological Warfare: Cyrus the Great
  • by James Scott
  • The proof of how well Cyrus the Great applied psychological techniques appears in how many today first hear of this 6th Century B.C.E. Persian King through Judeo-Christian traditions. Cyrus released upwards of 40,000 Jewish slaves from Persia, and allowed them to return to their homeland.
  • History of Psychological Warfare: Alexander the Great and The Mongols
  • by James Scott
  • Two centuries after Alexander III of Macedon first led his troops across the Hellespont, Persia may have felt little threat. In a few years, though, the reputation of Alexander the Great always arrived ahead of him in any place he sought to conquer. With each new battle the young genius reinforced his undefeated reputation
  • History of Psychological Warfare: The American Revolution and Franco-Prussian War
  • by James Scott
  • Whether considering Tamerlane's 90,000 skull pyramid outside Delhi to show the city what to expect without surrender, or medieval feudal lords shouting challenges over castle walls, overt propaganda has always been part of psychological warfare. Combined innovations of printing and airpower raised this into a new realm as early as the 19th Century. That was a little early for airplanes, but not for balloons.
  • History of Psychological Warfare: Fukoko Kyohei and The Spanish Civil War
  • by James Scott
  • Japan's isolation gave it one great benefit over all other nations in the advance of civilization. It allowed Japan to study how other nations advanced, assimilate what worked for them, and avoid their mistakes. When it finally took advantage of what it had learned from careful observation, it seemingly overnight turned from an agrarian society to an industrial power.
  • History of Psychological Warfare: WWII and China
  • by James Scott
  • Adolf Hitler's rise to power benefitted from the same technological tools that helped Franco in France. The Versailles Accords at the end of World War I had left Germany as a despised stepchild among the brotherhood of nations. Hitler actually had the audacity to wail his improbable vision from a prison cell, and but a few years later see it achieved.
  • History of Psychological Warfare inTibet and China
  • by James Scott
  • "The Chinese Revolution was imported to and imposed upon an unwilling Tibet by means of structural violence and psychological warfare." (Norbu, 2001, p. 109) According to Norbu the ill-advised advance of Mao Zedong's Cultural Revolution into Tibet may have been more about cultural genocide than about nationalizing communism.
  • History of Psychological Warfare: Viet Cong
  • by James Scott
  • The United States was waist deep in the Vietnam quagmire before recognizing what the psychological toll would be. The Domino Theory held little weight for many draftees, which left them with no sense of imminent threat to U.S. security. They fought because they had to against a force defending its homeland, creating an exploitable psychological weakness
  • History of Psychological Warfare: Cold War Era USA vs. USSR
  • by James Scott
  • The Cuban Missile Crisis was really when the United States won the Cold War. A true battle of wills with the fate of the world at stake, the showdown over Soviet missiles based in Cuba brought the two great powers to the brink of war for 13 days in October 1962. In the end the U.S. won, the Soviets backed down -- and likely for one reason.
  • History of Psychological Warfare: United States
  • by James Scott
  • Operation Desert Storm offers a good example of combined psychological warfare tactics as part of a unified strategy. Even as late a date as the early 1990s airdropped leaflets still proved effective psychological tools. Rank and file Iraqi soldiers given the opportunity surrendered en masse, clutching the little leaflets like their lives depended on them -- but that was not the most far-reaching use of psychological techniques.
  • History of Psychological Warfare: Asymmetric Warfare and Fourth Generation Warfare
  • by James Scott
  • Asymmetric warfare has become the 21st Century buzzword that ironically describes many of the 20th Century conflicts. It is best understood by comparing even older practices of aligning forces along battle fronts -- a somewhat symmetrical arrangement -- compared to conflict when uneven sides dispense with battle lines altogether. Wars by proxy . . .
  • Public V Private Sector Innovation - The Basis For Success
  • by Chris Goldspink
  • A recent comparative study of Private Sector CEOs and Public sector heads of agencies experience of innovation showed that the degree of uncertainty presented by the environment, whether the innovation was in response to an unexpected situation or part of a deliberate repositioning, along with differing means available for being proactive, most explained the difference between the sectors and the likelihood of success.
  • The New Uncertainty: Implications For Business And Society
  • by Chris Goldspink
  • New global hazards that largely result from human action, and institutions concerned with the short term, leads us to realize that we are ill prepared to deal with the uncertainty which now surrounds us. While these issues demand a long term perspective we see policy and investment increasingly responsive to the short term. This has consequences for our economy, business and society - indeed our standard of living.
  • Perception Management: Crisis Management In Critical Situations
  • by James Scott
  • Perception management becomes particularly important in crisis situations. Public perception has been important in industries recovering from product tampering related deaths in the 1980s, or the e. coli outbreaks at Jack in the Box restaurants of the 1990s.
  • Drug Arrest Economics: Just Let the Tax Payers Flip the Bill
  • by James Scott
  • Policy analysts and legislators continue to weigh the cost of United States drug prohibition as the issue appears more regularly in public debate. In "Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to Know," Mark Kleiman, Jonathan Caulkins and Angela Hawken contend that incarcerating low-level illegal drug dealers costs society more than it is worth.
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